Panels & Tiles

The terms “panels” and “tiles” are sometimes used interchangeably, and while the definition may vary between manufacturers, they all work to absorb sound and improve acoustics by applying to your walls and/or ceilings. Panels typically denote a larger format, often a 4′ x 8′ area, while tiles often describe products that are 2′ x 2′ or smaller, and are more commonly used as ceiling tiles, though of course these formats can vary wildly in design and implementation.

How do Panels and Tiles Affect Room Acoustics?

Tiles and acoustic panels work by reducing echo events and lowering reverberation times of sound energy within a room. In simpler terms, acoustic wall panels give sound energy somewhere to go.

Let’s look at a conference room with a tile floor, open deck ceiling and laminate panel walls, for example. Without a soft surface to absorb into, sound energy will continue to reflect off of hard surfaces in the space, stopping only when it has run out of energy. Covering or replacing those hard surfaces with acoustic tiles can help change the look, sound, and feeling of conference rooms or lobbies by providing a place for energy to absorb and diffuse into.

With acoustic tiles and panels, more is better. Using thicker material also tends to provide better acoustic results, and can provide an acoustic experience expected of recording studios and home theaters.

Felt: Superior Acoustic Wall Panels

While a number of foam materials and textiles can be used to dampen sound and soften surfaces, they pale in comparison to the acoustic performance and design flexibility of acoustic felt. Made from either 100% organic sheep’s wool or recycled PET material, these fibrous felt panels allow sound waves to penetrate into the product, but makes it difficult for the energy to escape. This means that the felt effectively traps sound within it, absorbing more energy than traditional foam panels or wall tiles.

When looking to reduce reverberation and echo events in a space, acoustic felt is one of the best products available for dampening sound energy and providing superior acoustic performance. As an added bonus, these aesthetically pleasing lightweight panels come in a huge range of colors and forms, giving you the freedom to design your project space according to your vision.

Sound Absorption Tips for Offices

Modern offices spaces usually use drywall, hard floors, and drop tile ceilings – three great reasons to invest in better acoustics, as these spaces are set up by default to create an extremely poor auditory experience. Covering as many of these surfaces as possible with acoustic wall panels, baffles, tiles and carpeting gives you a much better acoustic foundation.

In a finished office setting, you still have options to increase the effectiveness of your acoustics and reduce background noise in the space. If there are obstacles to installing full size acoustic panels, smaller acoustic tiles can instead contribute a large amount of sound absorption and help reduce echo events.

Modern offices typically feature large, open spaces, which open the door to a lot of wandering noise and reflected sound from other areas. Implementing hanging divider panels can help delineate space, get more out of your office, and dramatically improve acoustics while speaking to your brand.

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Panels & Tiles

The terms “panels” and “tiles” are sometimes used interchangeably, and while the definition may vary between manufacturers, they all work to absorb sound and improve acoustics by applying to your walls and/or ceilings. Panels typically denote a larger format, often a 4′ x 8′ area, while tiles often describe products that are 2′ x 2′ or smaller, and are more commonly used as ceiling tiles, though of course these formats can vary wildly in design and implementation.

How do Panels and Tiles Affect Room Acoustics?

Tiles and acoustic panels work by reducing echo events and lowering reverberation times of sound energy within a room. In simpler terms, acoustic wall panels give sound energy somewhere to go.

Let’s look at a conference room with a tile floor, open deck ceiling and laminate panel walls, for example. Without a soft surface to absorb into, sound energy will continue to reflect off of hard surfaces in the space, stopping only when it has run out of energy. Covering or replacing those hard surfaces with acoustic tiles can help change the look, sound, and feeling of conference rooms or lobbies by providing a place for energy to absorb and diffuse into.

With acoustic tiles and panels, more is better. Using thicker material also tends to provide better acoustic results, and can provide an acoustic experience expected of recording studios and home theaters.

Felt: Superior Acoustic Wall Panels

While a number of foam materials and textiles can be used to dampen sound and soften surfaces, they pale in comparison to the acoustic performance and design flexibility of acoustic felt. Made from either 100% organic sheep’s wool or recycled PET material, these fibrous felt panels allow sound waves to penetrate into the product, but makes it difficult for the energy to escape. This means that the felt effectively traps sound within it, absorbing more energy than traditional foam panels or wall tiles.

When looking to reduce reverberation and echo events in a space, acoustic felt is one of the best products available for dampening sound energy and providing superior acoustic performance. As an added bonus, these aesthetically pleasing lightweight panels come in a huge range of colors and forms, giving you the freedom to design your project space according to your vision.

Sound Absorption Tips for Offices

Modern offices spaces usually use drywall, hard floors, and drop tile ceilings – three great reasons to invest in better acoustics, as these spaces are set up by default to create an extremely poor auditory experience. Covering as many of these surfaces as possible with acoustic wall panels, baffles, tiles and carpeting gives you a much better acoustic foundation.

In a finished office setting, you still have options to increase the effectiveness of your acoustics and reduce background noise in the space. If there are obstacles to installing full size acoustic panels, smaller acoustic tiles can instead contribute a large amount of sound absorption and help reduce echo events.

Modern offices typically feature large, open spaces, which open the door to a lot of wandering noise and reflected sound from other areas. Implementing hanging divider panels can help delineate space, get more out of your office, and dramatically improve acoustics while speaking to your brand.

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